January at Crystal Bridges includes: Farewell to Temporary Exhibits, Tween Night, and Concert by the Symphony of Northwest Arkansas
December 22, 2016
Volunteer Spotlight: Robert “Brooks” Garner
January 1, 2017
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A Musical Crystal Bridges Tour, Courtesy of the Teen Council

Keith Haring (1958 - 1990) "Moses and the Burning Bush" 1985 Acrylic on canvas Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Crystal Bridges’ Teen Council is a group of awesome high school students from all across our area who meet regularly to socialize, learn about the museum, participate in artmaking activities, plan events for teens at the Museum, and provide our Education and Programming teams with insights into better ways to reach and engage with their peers.  It is a very insightful and fun group of young men and women, who have some great ideas about art and life. If you are a teenager, or have a teenager, who has never attended one of the Teen Council’s events, I encourage you to do so.

I’ve been looking for ways to get the Teen Council’s voice on the blog more regularly, and so I’ll be working with them every couple of months throughout 2017 to produce blog posts that reflect what the group is talking and thinking about when it comes to art at Crystal Bridges.  This month I asked them to put together a tour of some of their favorite artworks in the permanent collection, paired with some of their favorite songs, and give us some insights into the choices they made.  The results are below. –LD

 

If you want to listen to the Teen Council’s playlist, you can find it on Spotify here, all you need is a free Spotify account.

 

Crystal Bridges’ Teen Council Tour and Playlist

Stanton MacDonald-Wright (1890-1973) Synchromy 1918 Oil on canvas

Stanton MacDonald-Wright (1890-1973)
Synchromy
1918
Oil on canvas

“Safe If We Don’t Look Down” — Mutemath

“My reasoning behind this song was simply that they give me a similar vibe. The painting seems upbeat and happy, trustworthy. And the song makes me think of comfort and safety, taking a risk, but for your own happiness and comfort.”   — Virginia Hammond, 11th grade

 

 

Gabriel Dawe
“Plexus No. 27”
2014, Thread and steel hooks
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“Palladio (1st Movement)” — Karl Jenkins

“From beneath Plexus No. 27, the piece looks small and slightly one-dimensional. As you change your perspective, the piece seems to shift and expand. “Palladio” also starts small and contained but grows quickly into the recognizable epic that it has become.”   — Caroline Gschwend, 12th grade

 

 

William Trost Richards (1833-1905) "Along the Shore" 1903 Oil on canvas Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

William Trost Richards (1833-1905)
“Along the Shore”
1903
Oil on canvas
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“The World Was Wide Enough”    —Hamilton soundtrack

“I chose this song for this piece because the song is about Aaron Burr killing Alexander Hamilton during a duel. They were kind of ‘frenemies,’ one might say, and respected each other. During the duel, Hamilton shot toward the sky, but Burr got paranoid and shot Hamilton, killing his “‘irst friend and enemy.’ He talks during the rest of the song about how, even though Hamilton was the one that died, he was the one that paid for it, because now he had to live, knowing he killed his friend. This painting made me think of this song because it looks dreary and sad, and there is one lone bird in the sky, which makes me think of Burr, feeling alone after the loss of Hamilton. The waves and sky show a kind of stormy conflict, symbolizing the duel.”    — Virginia Hammond, 11th grade

 

 

Dorothea Tanning (1910 - 2012) "The Truth About Comets," 1945 Oil on canvas Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Dorothea Tanning (1910 – 2012)
“The Truth About Comets,” 1945
Oil on canvas
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“Counting Stars” — OneRepublic

“Similar to the song, the piece depicts the theme of dreaming to be something more/magical. The song talks about not counting money but ‘counting stars.’ Not only does the picture actually have the two girls watching a comet but it symbolizes that there are more important things beyond the material.”  — Alex Cantey, 11th grade

 

 

Sol Lewitt (1928-2007) Wall Drawing #880 Loopy Doopy (orange and green) 1998/2013/2016 Acrylic paint at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Sol Lewitt (1928-2007)
Wall Drawing #880 Loopy Doopy (orange and green)
1998/2013/2016
Acrylic paint
at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“I Just Can’t Wait To Be King” — From The Lion King – Jason Weaver

“During this song in The Lion King there is a demonstration of bright colors and lots of movement. Loopy Doopy appears very childish and simple–very similar to Simba’s character at this point in the movie/musical.   — Alex Cantey, 11th grade

 

 

Lyonel Feininger (1871 - 1956) "Schlossgasse," 1915 Oil on canvas Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Lyonel Feininger (1871 – 1956)
“Schlossgasse,” 1915
Oil on canvas
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“Cold As Ice” — Foreigner

“This piece reminds me of this song because the color scheme is like the idea of  ‘cold as ice’ in the title and chorus. The bold lines remind me of the upbeat and sharp tones in the rhythm of the song.”  –Virginia Hammond, 11th grade

 

 

Ruth Asawa (1926 - 2013) "Untitled," 1965-1970 Bronze wire Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Ruth Asawa (1926 – 2013)
“Untitled,” 1965-1970
Bronze wire
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“Pretty Hurts” — Beyonce

and 

“Boulevard of Broken Dreams” — Green Day

“I thought of ‘Boulevard of Broken Dreams’ when I looked at this piece for many reasons. For one, the dark coloring reminds me of the depressing theme of the lyrics. The sharp ends remind me of the sharp change between slower and rhythmic beats to almost-upbeat-sounding chorus. Finally, the idea that this piece is one full, flowing piece, that it is all one thing and it is the only focus, makes me think of how the song talks about being alone, with only your shadow next to you.”  –Virginia Hammond, 11th grade

 

 

Wayne Thiebaud b. 1920 "Supine Woman" 1963 Oil on canvas Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Wayne Thiebaud b. 1920
“Supine Woman” 1963
Oil on canvas
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“Lazy Song” — Bruno Mars

 

 

 

Keith Haring (1958 - 1990) "Moses and the Burning Bush" 1985 Acrylic on canvas Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Keith Haring (1958 – 1990)
“Moses and the Burning Bush” 1985
Acrylic on canvas
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“Fuga Y Mysterio” — Piazzolla – String version 

“The pattern overlaying the depiction of Moses and the burning bush reminds me of the bold overlapping melodies in ‘Fuga Y Mysterio’ as well as the path tango dancers take.” –Caroline Gschwend, 12th grade

 

 

Tom Uttech (b. 1942) Enassamishhinjijweian, 2009 Oil on linen Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Tom Uttech (b. 1942)
Enassamishhinjijweian, 2009
Oil on linen
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

“On My Way” — Phil Collins (specifically the Brother Bear scene using this song)

 

 

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) Rosie the Riveter 1943 Oil on canvas Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)
Rosie the Riveter
1943
Oil on canvas
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR

“Superwoman” — Alicia Keys

“Rosie is about women filling the role that men left behind and exceeding in the workforce.  She shows women in America that you can be strong and independent.”  –Braxton Carney, 12th grade

 

Linda DeBerry
Senior Copy Editor / Publications Manager

1 Comment

  1. nadir_khan04@rediffmail.com'/ osusum says:

    These very special loans offer a wonderful opportunity for visitors to view works by American Modernists side-by-side with masters of the European avant-garde who had great influence in America,” says Crystal Bridges Director of Curatorial Affairs, Margi Conrads.

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