July 25 through October 5, 2015

This exhibition examines Jamie Wyeth’s distinctive approach to realism over the course of six decades, from his precocious childhood drawings through recurring themes inspired by the people, places, and objects that populate his world. Wyeth’s career offers new insight into contemporary realism and surrealism with an emphasis on the American context for these styles. Wyeth comes from a family of artists, including his grandfather, Newell Convers Wyeth (1882-1945); his father, Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009); and his aunt, Caroline Wyeth Hurd (1909-1994). He was encouraged to seriously pursue art at a young age, but never attended art school. Instead, he left school at the age of 11 and received instruction at home from his aunt, a surrealist painter, with critical guidance from his father. Later, Wyeth studied anatomy by sketching cadavers in a New York City morgue, and worked with Andy Warhol in the Factory. His strain of realism has consequently evolved in directions that are significantly different from that of his grandfather and father.

Your 15 Minutes Seconds Of Fame

“In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.”
–Andy Warhol

We’ve created a Wyeth & Warhol Selfie Booth where you can fashion your image with the flash of Warhol or the mystery of Wyeth. Recreate Wyeth’s Pumpkinhead – Self Portrait, or add some pop with Warhol’s signature style. Which will you choose?

Once you’ve created your picture, we’ll email you a copy with the opportunity to share on all social media outlets. Check out our Tumblr page for more Warhol and Wyeth inspired self-portraits from Museum guests! Don’t forget to click “Share with Tumblr” when saving your selfie to join our photo stream. View Photo Stream Here!  #JamieWyeth #WarholsNature #CrystalBridges


Inferno – Film by D'Arcy Marsh and Jamie Wyeth

Digital video (color, sound), 8 minutes

In this short 8-minute film, Jamie Wyeth is shown painting Inferno, Monhegan (2006), explaining his technique and sources of inspiration—in this case, the wild, tough seagulls of his island home—as he works. Video courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts Boston.