Crystal Bridges is open to the public, with timed tickets and walk-ups welcome as capacity allows. Learn more.
Crystal Bridges is open to the public, with timed tickets and walk-ups welcome as capacity allows. Learn more.

Museum Way Podcast: Summer in Crystal Bridges’ North Forest

Hear about how 120-acres of trails and grounds is maintained, including the variety of ways landscaping compliments art, and how programs like the popular Forest Concert Series and the first-ever Museum Camp-Out help connect visitors to art and nature. This episode features Avant Gardener Coordinator, Marina McCoy, from the Horticulture Team and Sara Segerlin, Senior Manager, Public Programs and Community Engagement.

 

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Episode Transcript

Stace:
Welcome to Museum Way, the podcast of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. We’re sharing all the ins and outs of the museum, from the galleries to the trails, the architecture, and more. You’ll learn the Museum Way of Crystal Bridges. This summer, we’re celebrating art, nature, and color at Crystal Bridges. You’re invited to explore indoor and outdoor exhibitions, art, sculpture, concerts, and more that will engage all your senses and inspire you to explore the natural world.

Stace:
In the museum’s temporary exhibition galleries, you’ll discover Nature’s Nation, an exhibition exploring how artists have portrayed our natural world over the past 300 years. Outside, you’ll be wonder-struck with colorful bold sculptures against the backdrop of the North Forest in Color Field.

Stace:
Explore the grounds and welcome back four beloved Chihuly sculptures, and create art in the newly designed art space, The Studio. Beneath the trees of the North Forest, enjoy music and dance every Saturday evening. In today’s episode, we’re talking all about art, nature, and summer at the museum. First, we’ll meet Marina McCoy, Avant-Gardener Coordinator on our trails and grounds team. We’ll hear about the work she does on the beautiful campus of Crystal Bridges. Then we’ll talk with Sara Segerlin, Senior Manager of Public Programs and Community Engagement, to hear about the exciting events we have coming up, including our Forest Concert Series.

Stace:
Summer is calling. So, let’s jump into this episode of Museum Way.

Stace:
We’re here with Avant-Gardener Coordinator, Marina McCoy. Welcome, Marina.

Marina:
Hi, Stace. Thank you for having me.

Stace:
So I got to say, your title Avant-Gardener Coordinator, now, that’s a clever play on words. The Avant-Gardener.

Marina:
It’s a little bit of an art pun. Yes.

Stace:
So, tell me about it.

Marina:
So, the Avant-Gardener program is a volunteer program for people who work outside helping the trails and grounds crew at the museum. So, it’s outdoor, gardening, nature-focused volunteer program.

Stace:
Wow. So, you’ve probably got some pretty impressive volunteers.

Marina:
We do. So, we have a great mix. We have people who are new to the area, new to gardening, just want to learn about native plants. We have a lot of people from the area who are master gardeners, master naturalists. We have people who’ve been volunteering on the trails since before the museum opened. So, it’s a great program.

Stace:
Wow. How many people are working with you in this?

Marina:
We’ve got a core group of about 15 people, and they’re out there a couple times a month working in a regular shift in an area on the grounds.

Stace:
So, you have the trails and grounds team … Well, first of all, let’s talk about how big it is, how big our grounds are.

Marina:
So, our grounds, we have 120 acres.

Stace:
Uh huh.

Marina:
And we have a trails and grounds crew of ten people.

Stace:
Okay. Wow. So, that’s 12 acres a piece.

Marina:
Per person, yeah.

Stace:
And then you have the gardeners, the Avant-Gardeners.

Marina:
The volunteers, yes. So, they’re a great help to cover that area.

Stace:
Now, how do you all manage that? That seems to be an awful lot of space to cover.

Marina:
It’s a large space, and there’s also many different types of spaces in there. We have lawns, we have landscape beds, we have just open forest. So, we are split up between a grounds crew, which
cares for the lawns, maintains the trails, does a lot of our construction and installation for things like new artworks.

Stace:
Ah.

Marina:
And then we have a Horticulture Team. And the Horticulture Team, which is the team I’m part of, we’re focused on taking care of the plantings.

Stace:
Okay. Well, tell me a little bit about your planting strategy because, and I’m going to get to your background in just a second, but you had mentioned earlier the term native plants. Tell me a little bit about the importance of that.

Marina:
Okay. So, native plants are plants that are found in this area. They’re really closely connected to the other living things in this area. So, the wildlife, things like that. So, they’re an important part of the ecosystem, and we use a lot at Crystal Bridges. They’re actually kind of a little bit of an advantage for gardeners because they’re adapted to the conditions that we have here. So, it’s actually a little bit less work to get a native plant going than it is maybe for a different plant that wants a different type of environment. So, they actually take off pretty quick.

Stace:
Yeah. You can really kind of predict their behavior.

Marina:
Yeah, yeah. And so, they’re really tough and resilient. They will stand up to the heat and the humidity in the summer. So, and they’re also just beautiful, and they are a home to wildlife. So, that’s why we’re using native plants.

Stace:
Well, tell us a little bit about the wildlife element.

Marina:
All right.

Stace:
Because we certainly have a lot of great creatures that roam our grounds.

Marina:
You will definitely see wildlife walking out on the trails. So, we’re trying to manage for wildlife on the grounds.

Stace:
So what does that mean?

Marina:
We’re planting plants that will attract wildlife. We’re planting a lot of things for native bees, we’re planting host plants for butterflies, we’re planting plants with seeds and berries for birds. So, that’s a big part, just our plant choices.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
And then we’re also using practices that will encourage wildlife. So, we’re not using pesticides or herbicides in the beds. We are careful about when we cut things back, we want to leave up material where animals might make a home in the winter. We want to leave seeds and berries there for in the winter, for the birds that over winter. So, we’re kind of careful about paying attention to the life cycle of the wildlife we have, and kind of arranging our practices to suite that.

Stace:
So, we really have a lot of them that live on the grounds.

Marina:
Yeah.

Stace:
Which is fantastic.

Marina:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stace:
How many deer, you figure?

Marina:
I think we have at least 20.

Stace:
Uh huh.

Marina:
Maybe more.

Stace:
It’s fun because in the spring, we obviously had new baby deer.

Marina:
We had fawns. Did you see the twins last year?

Stace:
I did see the twins, yes. They’re so accustomed to the grounds that, even when we come down in our shuttle, they’ll be standing right there by the Museum Way as you come in, and they’re rarely freaked out too much.

Marina:
Yeah. They’re a little bit used to people, yeah.

Stace:
Yeah. That’s great. And then there’s that beautiful deer sculpture that I always think is, “Wow, I wonder what the deer think of that thing.”

Marina:
I think they pass by it almost every day, they really love the North Forest.

Stace:
Yeah. We see them out there all the time. So, your background. You come from an interesting background. Tell me a little bit about where you’re from and what you did before you came here to
Crystal Bridges.

Marina:
Okay. I’m from this area. I grew up in Madison County on a farm on a mountaintop in the Boston Mountains. So, it’s a really beautiful rural area.

Stace:
Very picturesque, I imagine.

Marina:
Very picturesque, yes. And I went to school out in California, went to college there. After college, I moved to New York City.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
Across the country.

Stace:
I just want to say she went to Stanford University, everybody. Just plug that, okay?

Marina:
Right.

Stace:
And then to New York.

Marina:
Then to New York, yeah. And so, I was in New York for about 13 years. I did a lot of work in nonprofit fundraising.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
I think about halfway through, I was getting a little homesick. I was missing the outdoors. And so, I decided to try working outside.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
I grew up helping my parents out on the farm, and I really loved working with vegetables, I loved working in the greenhouse starting new plants. So, I started an internship in Horticulture at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. And from there, I really got into working in parks and gardens in New York City. And it was a really interesting time to be starting off in Horticulture. There was a huge interest in native plants.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
There were also a lot of new parks being built. So, I worked at the High Line for a quick minute.

Stace:
Yes, of course.

Marina:
And I worked at this park called Brooklyn Bridge Park, which was a brand-new park on the East River, Brooklyn side, built on old shipping piers. So-

Stace:
Oh, wow.

Marina:
… everything new, brought in all of the dirt, made all of the landforms, brought in all of the plants. But the plants were predominantly native plants. So, we had lawns and playgrounds, but we also had wetlands and woodlands. And so, I actually learned a lot about nature just in the middle of the city, surrounded by skyscrapers. So, it was an interesting way to do it.

Stace:
Yeah. I have to make a plug to a collection connection here, which is the Winter Scene in Brooklyn.

Marina:
Oh, yeah. Yeah, that is right … Part of our park just borders on that, just looking at that. Yeah.

Stace:
Yeah, yeah. So, when you explore the digital interactive with Winter Scene in Brooklyn, it shows a modern-day vision or image, and it’s really right under where the Brooklyn Bridge is.

Marina:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stace:
And so, that’s right in the area that you worked and you revitalized from an industrial space to a green space.

Marina:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stace:
Oh. That’s really cool. So, what brought you home?

Marina:
I wanted to move back home. I wanted to be closer to family.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
And I was really lucky when I was in the process of moving, talked to the trails and grounds crew here and they had a position open. So, I started here right after I moved.

Stace:
Oh, you can’t beat that. Well, we’re glad to have you. I was wondering if you can tell us a little bit about … This summer, for one thing, we’re debuting our very first outdoor special exhibition, and it’s a sculpture exhibition called Color Field. And so, we’re really exploring the idea of nature and color as it impacts and relates to art. How do you in the grounds team prepare for, let’s say, the plant and landscaping element of a sculpture installation?

Marina:
[inaudible 00:09:37]. So, I think that process, it starts really early and involves a lot of different departments at the museum. So, there’s a team that includes trails and grounds, also curatorial interpretation.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
And they bring a lot of different perspectives. And they think about what the best site is for a sculpture, how they want people to approach it, what the access should be like. And so, we’re using plants, really, to compliment the sculpture.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
We’re not really trying for a design that’s going to compete with it or overpower it. We really want to make it a natural experience for the guest.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marina:
And we’re also sometimes using plants to solve problems. So, we have some sculptures where maybe they have elements we don’t want people to get too close. So-

Stace:
Or climb on them.

Marina:
Or climb on them, right? So, Dancing in Nigeria, which is up in the North Forest, is a good example. That’s a yellow metal sculpture. It’s really elegant and playful. It has one part that is a
small ladder, and it’s really attractive to children.

Stace:
Yeah.

Marina:
So, and when we cited that, we needed to set it apart a little bit. So, we elevated it, we put it on kind of a low berm, and we planted that berm really densely so it’s full of sedges and hollies. It’s actually pretty hard to get to the sculpture.

Stace:
Hollies.

Marina:
Hollies, yes.

Stace:
So, they’re prickly.

Marina:
They’re prickly.

Stace:
Ah ha.

Marina:
You [crosstalk 00:10:53]-

Stace:
A natural deterrent.

Marina:
Yeah.

Stace:
That’s very clever. So, that is the strategic way of using the plants in certain ways. All right. Well Marina, tell me about an upcoming project that you’re really excited about.

Marina:
Well, I think I’m really excited for Color Field. We have all of these new sculptures, they have this incredible new landscape surrounding them, and I’m really excited to see how those plants take off, how it fills in, how people interact with the landscape. The North Forest is just a beautiful place to be in the evening, so I’m really excited to come to a concert, take some time to walk around and just check out all of the beautiful scenery.

Stace:
Yeah. Well, we’re really excited about it, as well. And in fact, we’re going to be speaking with Sara Segerlin next about that Forest Concert Series, where we introduce music into the equation. Well Marina, thank you so much for joining us on Museum Way. This has been fascinating.

Marina:
Thank you, Stace.

Stace:
Enjoy two special exhibitions this summer at Crystal Bridges. Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment examines artists’ impact on shaping environmental understanding and stewardship. Featuring 100 artworks from 70 eminent U.S. collections, Nature’s Nation traces 300 years of evolving ideas about the natural world and our place within it. In the North Forest, take a whimsical walk and experience Color Field, a new outdoor exhibition featuring large colorful sculptures against the lush backdrop of the Ozark Forest. Immerse yourself completely in this enchanting exhibition and experience the impact color has on our lives.

Stace:
Summer exhibitions tickets include Nature’s Nation and Color Field, and are $16 between June 1st and September 9th. More info at crystalbridges.org.

Stace:
We’re here with Sara Segerlin, Senior Manager of Public Programs and Community Engagement. Welcome, Sara.

Sara:
Hi, Stace.

Stace:
Well, I’m excited to have you on the show because you’ve had been recently promoted, and we’re going to talk about that in a minute. And we’re also going to talk about the exciting Forest Concert Series. But before we do that, I find that your background before you came to the museum to be really interesting. Can you tell us a little bit about the things that you did prior to coming to Crystal Bridges eight years ago?

Sara:
Wow. Eight years ago. It’s so wonderful to live in Arkansas. Now I feel like it’s my home, that I’ve been here for eight years. But before that, I was a highly exploratory person. That’s just my nature. And I studied Interdisciplinary Art at the Visual Studies Workshop. I got my Master in Fine Arts in Rochester, New York, and I started the ImageMovementSound festival at Rochester Institute of Technology, which was a mix of theater, dance, film, animation, and artists came together and created new works, and we made a festival.

Stace:
That sounds like a lot of fun.

Sara:
It was a lot of fun. And it’s interesting to see different art disciplines pair with each other, and also the comradery and collaboration amongst artists. That fueled my interest in the interdisciplinary experience of art. And from there, I got a few jobs with dance companies, I lived on a rock and roll bus with the Moscow Ballet, and traveled to 50 cities across the U.S., and slept on the bus at night and brought the props out in the morning, did photography. And then I headed over to L.A., thinking I wanted to be a filmmaker, and landed a role for The Museum of Neon Art, which is this interesting boutique funky neon art kinetic museum.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Sara:
But was really popular because of it’s neon signs and lighter installations that were quite contemporary.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Sara:
And so, we started a music series, glassblowing workshops. We got highly involved with the Downtown L.A. Art Walk scene, which was about 50,000 visitors every Thursday.

Stace:
Oh, wow.

Sara:
And we would do a variety of neon parties.

Stace:
That sounds like fun.

Sara:
Yes. It was definitely fun, and it’s great to hang out with neon people because they’re very kooky and quirky. My time in L.A. was very rewarding personally and professionally, and just being able to make connections with people through art, which guided my direction to apply for a job at Crystal Bridges.

Stace:
Yeah. So, I was just sitting here thinking in my head as you’ve been speaking, “What in the world lured you to Northwest Arkansas?” And I know Crystal Bridges is a big thing, but this is before we actually opened, wasn’t it?

Sara:
Yes. So, I came at a time six months before we opened, and I started the adult programming department and all of the various things that we do. But basically, I’m an art producer. And to find work in the arts, you have to move.

Stace:
Yeah. So, talk a little bit about how Crystal Bridges programming has morphed and changed and grown over the last eight years.

Sara:
Just the participation has been very high. So, in the first few years, we were beginning our lecture talk series, and our films, and we were trying music in the galleries, and we were trying to do first-Friday music concerts on the trails, and trail mix, and all of those things. And the attendance was just through the roof.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Sara:
And people asking for more art experiences at Crystal Bridges. And part of our mission is access and education, and that is just something that’s just so beautiful about the design of Crystal Bridges to welcome all, and offer accessible programs.

Stace:
So, talk to me about the Forest Concert Series. I think we’re approaching our third year, is that correct?

Sara:
Yes, this is our third year for the Forest Concert Series. However, we have done summer music concert series for the last six years.

Stace:
What’s new about the Forest Concert Series since we’ve opened the forest two years ago? Of course that was a big deal with Chihuly in the forest. What’s happening this year?

Sara:
I think that we’re better understanding the music experience that our audience is looking for. We want to be able to showcase emerging musicians, mid-career touring bands, as well as local musicians. And there’s so many genres that each individual is attracted to. It could be jam funk music, soul, it could be folk or indie or bluegrass, or it could be …

Stace:
Jazz.

Sara:
Jazz, yeah. Everyone loves jazz. Jazz fusion.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Sara:
And so, we’ve tried to create something for everyone. And so, we really have it well-balanced with different musical genres throughout the nine concerts. We collaborate with a variety of festivals throughout northwest Arkansas, so the music network is highly collaborative. We work a lot together in sharing different band names and ideas.

Sara:
So, we’re working with the Spaceberry Festival that’s quite popular in Eureka Springs.

Stace:
Yes.

Sara:
And they’re going to feature the works as well as Friends of the Family, which is a local Grateful Dead cover band led by Chris Anderson. And I do have to give a shout-out to Chris, he’s just so ecstatic about being able to collaborate with Crystal Bridges. He also works with me on the Light Night party, which is in August. And that brings about 8,000 people. And we do have a few interesting bands that we booked. And I can’t share about it quite yet.

Stace:
Stay tuned.

Sara:
Stay tuned. And then onward, Arkansauce, they are hot in northwest Arkansas. They travel all-

Stace:
Yeah. They’re definitely a favorite band.

Sara:
All over the U.S. But they’re going to be paired with these amazing Delta blues musicians, with Marcus “Mookie” Cartwright and James “gone for good”. And then a Delta singer, Vera White. And so, I really like the mixing and merging of different genres in the forest because the forest has an amazing experience of how the music sweeps through the trees. Acoustically, it’s perfect. You get to be outdoors, I think the trees also help absorb some of the sound. But it’s great because you could be about a quarter of a mile away down the trail looking at a sculpture and hear this fantastic music in the background.

Sara:
I’m going to highlight two more. Black Pumas. Black Pumas are right now the top ten band in South by Southwest. And we lucked out working with Troy Campbell with House of Songs. So again, it’s about working with the music community on ideas about music groups coming through that are popular. And Black Pumas just signed a recording deal, and they’ll be headlining that concert. And we’ll be working with Robert Ginsberg’s NWA Jazz Society, which will open for Black Pumas with Alisha Pattillo on the saxophone. It’s-

Stace:
That’s super exciting.

Sara:
So again, it’s these little interesting stories that the community can come together and see on the music stage. Another excellent group to talk about is Flor De Toloache. They are a Latin, Grammy-winning, all-female mariachi band for the Best Ranchero album. Mariachi music is so beautiful. And to hear that music in the forest, I’m just dreaming about it.

Stace:
Uh huh, uh huh.

Sara:
And then what we’re going to do is work with Papa Rap, who is also very popular in the Latin music scene here in northwest Arkansas, and he’s putting together a new musical group off of his residency with the House of Songs to open for Flor De Toloache. And then we’re also going to do a mariachi band convening of all the local mariachi bands to meet Flor De Toloache group, then to greet the guests as they come into the forest, and then to do a call and response.

Stace:
Ah, that sounds fantastic.

Sara:
So, yes, this is what we are planning.

Stace:
Wow.

Sara:
I am excited for how the community will experience that. We often do little surprise things in the Forest Concert. Sometimes we might do a site-specific dance, something during intermission to engage the guests to see the forest and the sculptures in a new way. We also provide art-making at this event. And sometimes we have different themes, like for the final one, we’re working with the Fayetteville Roots Festival and Brian Henry to do a showcase of some of his musicians that he’s periodically worked with.

Sara:
But it will also be our lightning bug hunt night.

Stace:
Oh, no.

Sara:
And guests can run around and catch lightning bugs for a moment. Of course, let them fly away.

Stace:
Yes. No jars, please.

Sara:
Yes. And Don Steinkraus, who’s an etymologist at the University of Arkansas, will be leading a little beetle microscope viewing experience, and also talk about how male and female lightning bugs talk to each other with their light blinking.

Sara:
So again, each concert has its own unique vibe based upon the musical genre. There’s also a fantastic food truck, cash bar hopping. And again, the art-making is super fun for the little kids. We usually see about 2,000 people show up.

Stace:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Sara:
And-

Stace:
Are you expecting perhaps more this year? Not sure?

Sara:
I would probably say 2,000 is a good amount for each one. Last year when we had The Beatles tribute band, we had about 2,500, and that was pretty packed.

Stace:
That was pretty insane.

Sara:
In the little round circle of trees. But I’ll have to say, the experience of being in these huge Ozark trees towering over you that are 100 years old with these fantastic creative music bands and music, it really is … I don’t have a word for it.

Stace:
Magical?

Sara:
It’s magical. The musicians love it. They’re always like, “Oh my gosh, I’ve never gotten to perform in such a beautiful space, on a fantastic stage with good sound at a museum.” And I think that that’s the hook, is that it’s a great music concert series that’s progressive. It’s at a museum, and it’s in a forest. Those three combos, you can’t get anywhere else.

Stace:
And it’s affordable.

Sara:
And it’s very affordable. Actually, your ticket primarily, it’s a $15 ticket. $12 for members. But that ticket basically gets you into the Color Field exhibition, and then you, surprise, get this awesome concert. And then there’s a food truck, and art-making. So, it’s a really good deal.

Stace:
Yeah. And a really wonderful experience, as well. And one little tidbit, there will be a camping event this year for the first time.

Sara:
Yes. We always have to do new things. We have to be innovative and experimental, and keep the museum as an interesting space for people. So, this year, we’re trying our first camp-out ever. It is on the solstice, Friday, June 21st. We have about 75 tent sites that we’ve identified for campers to walk in their gear. So, highlight, you need to walk in with your tent gear to your space. But we’ll provide all of the catering, we’re have the food truck open. You’ll get grilled dinner, s’mores all night. You’ll have breakfast in the morning, we’ll have a cash bar going. We’ll have musicians, folk acoustic musicians, Melody Pond, Shannon Wurst, Bayard Blain, Jamie Lou and The Hullabaloo, playing throughout the night.

Sara:
We’re going to have Robert Lewis, who is an indigenous storyteller, sharing stories about the native experience. We’re going to have Don Steinkraus come back out and talk more about bugs and investigation of bugs, which is quite interesting. There’s a lot of bugs in the forest.

Stace:
[inaudible 00:25:45].

Sara:
Not to scare anyone away. But the beetles are very interesting to look at. And then we’re also going to do a Wizard of Oz screening, which I know sounds strange. But it has to do with Color Field, and the camp-outs in Color Field. And there’s a sculpture by Sam Finch, who created this grid of colors on a mural, and the colors on the gird are based upon his study of The Wizard of Oz.

Sara:
So, we’re going to put The Wizard of Oz screening next to Sam Finch’s artwork. And that’s only happening at the camp-out. So I hope people join.

Stace:
So, apart from all of that, what else are you most excited for at the museum this summer?

Sara:
The summer is our season when the museum comes alive. We just have events happening all the time that are free and fun, and things to do outside. Art-making is huge at the museum, and I’m excited that we will have The Studio reopening, our experience art studio for families, multi-generational groups, little kids. We’re actually revamping it to have more art-making that’s wet and messy instead of the dry ones, as well as having artists doing demos in there. And then also, we are extending the studio space so you can do into our drop-in art-making studio and have more access to art-making throughout the summer that’s free.

Sara:
So, I’m very excited about that piece as well as the summer camps. My favorite thing is to see all the little kids at the museum learning about art, experiencing art, walking to a sculpture, going on a nature walk. So, I highly recommend that many people sign up their kiddos for summer camp. And then the final piece is this summer, we are going to spend a significant amount of time listening to the community. I’m excited to hear what we learn. We’ll be having a variety of listening sessions in Springdale and Rogers, where our Community Engagement Initiative will be talking to individuals, organizations, churches, taqueria owners, libraries, city officials. We’re going to spend this whole summer listening. And that’s what I’m looking forward to.

Stace:
Well, that’s really great. That’s a part of our new initiative of a community engagement. And I will mention for the summer camps, just go over to crystalbridges.org, and sign up there. Sara, thank you so much for coming in and sharing with us all this exciting energy, and the programs of the Crystal Bridges Summer of Art, Nature, and Color. Thanks.

Sara:
Thank you, Stace.

Stace:
Spend your summer Saturday evenings with the Crystal Bridges Forest Concert Series. This series of musical performances merge national and local acts in our beautiful North Forest. Bring your own lawn chair or blanket to enjoy music and dancing under the forest trees. A food truck and cash bar will be available throughout the night, as well as art-making activities.

Stace:
This year’s lineup includes The Vine Brothers, Dawson’s Hollow, Arkansauce, Audiopharmacy, and many more. Tickets and more info at crystalbridges.org.

Stace:
Thanks for tuning into Museum Way. We hope you enjoyed the episode, and tune in each month to hear more. Head over to our social media channels and leave a question or comment about what you’d like to hear on future episodes. I’m Stace Treat, and I’ll catch you next time right here on Museum Way.